dating love man de - No dating policy for employees

by  |  09-Feb-2015 03:01

While it can make some managers uncomfortable to tell employees what to do on their off time, the purpose of a formal policy is to keep employees effective and productive.

Make sure employees understand the position of the company isn’t to control their personal lives, but to ensure a fair and comfortable work environment for everyone.

Workplace romances tend to be the stuff of legend – either because a department (or entire company) got dragged into the drama, or the couple lives happily ever after. For that reason, many companies discourage interoffice dating. Yes, it may feel weird to try and control someone’s love life, but your job as a leader is to ensure a fair and equitable workplace.

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Here are a few common stipulations that companies include in an employee dating policy: Having a formal policy doesn’t mean you have to write someone up every time you find out about a casual date.

However, you do have to act immediately if productivity is affected, if you get complaints from employees, or gossip and conflict are tearing a department apart. Some conversation starters might include: Should employees get involved, some companies have the partners sign a “love contract.” Such documents specify that the relationship is consensual, that the pair will behave professionally, won’t engage in favoritism nor will take legal action against the employer, or each other, if the relationship ends.

How much jurisdiction does a business leader really have over employees’ off-time?

Just a few of the real-world difficulties caused by workplace romance that I’ve seen during my career include: Interestingly, the Society for Human Resource Management reports that while HR professionals aren’t reporting more workplace romances, the number of companies that have adopted formal romance policies has sharply increased. Can a policy protect your company from charges of sexual harassment or favoritism, conflict or morale problems?

Currently Eric is a human resources specialist at Insperity supporting clients with 50 – 100 employees, and frequently contributes articles to local Boston media outlets on current HR trends and topics.

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